andrewstuntpilot:

Shakespeare’s Deaths and Murders infographic, by Caitlin Griffin at Drown My Books.

This was sent to me this afternoon by my former English Lit. tutor. File under: classroom wall displays. 

5 months ago · 62,747 notes
#shakespeare #english #literature 

theanimejunkie:

bossubossupromode:

Two students, James and John were given a grammar test by their teacher. The question was, “is it better to use “had” or “had had” in this example sentence?”

The teacher collected the tests, and looked over their answers.

James, while John had had “had”, had had “had had.” “Had had” had had a better effect on the teacher.

welcome to the english language

French: This chair is feminine! "La Chaise!"

Italian: This chair is feminine! "La sedia!"

German: This chair is masculine! "Der Stuhl!"

English: This chair is a fucking object, I don't see a skirt or a pair of trousers anywhere on its cold hard surface, you people are fucking insane.

ouyangdan:

crewdlydrawn:

allthingslinguistic:

hyperboreanhapocanthosaurus:

So you know what I don’t get? Why people repeat words. (x)

Grammar time: it’s called “contrastive reduplication,” and it’s a form of intensification that is relatively common. Finnish does a very similar thing, and others use near-reduplication (rhyme-based) to intensify, like Hungarian (pici ‘tiny’, ici-pici ‘very tiny’).

Even the typologically-distant group of Bantu languages utilize reduplication in a strikingly similar fashion with nouns: Kinande oku-gulu ‘leg’, oku-gulu-gulu ‘a REAL leg’ (Downing 2001, includes more with verbal reduplication as well).

I suppose the difficult aspect of English reduplication is not through this particular type, but the fact that it utilizes many other types of reduplication: baby talk (choo-choo, no-no), rhyming (teeny-weeny, super-duper), and the ever-famous “shm” reduplication: fancy-schmancy (a way of denying the claim that something is fancy).

screams my professor was trying to find an example of reduplication so the next class he came back and said “I FOUND REDUPLICATION IN ENGLISH” and then he said “Milk milk” and everyone was just “what?” and he said “you know when you go to a coffee shop and they ask if you want soy milk and you say ‘no i want milk milk’” and everyone just had this collective sigh of understanding.

Another name for this particular construction is contrastive focus reduplication, and there’s a famous linguistics paper about it which is commonly known as the Salad Salad Paper. You know, because if you want to make it clear that you’re not talking about pasta salad or potato salad, you might call it “salad salad”. The repetition indicates that you’re intending the most prototypical meaning of the word, like green salad or cow’s milk, even though other things can be considered types of salad or milk. 

Can I make love to this post?… Is that a thing that’s possible?

i just had a linguistgasm.

(Source: gifmethat)

6 months ago · 217,931 notes
#language #english 

phrux:

pipesandrage:

papervaglife:

ugly-privilege:

beben-eleben:

Collective names for some animals

dumbfounded a murder of crows isn’t on here.

my english told me that a group of unicorns is called a blessing and thats the most beautiful thing I’ve ever heard

A GROUP OF PORCUPINES IS CALLED A PRICKLE AND IF YOU DON’T THINK THAT’S THE MOST ADORABLE SHIT THAN GET OUT OF MY FUCKING FACE

what’s troubling about a buncha goldfish

lauriehalseanderson:

My bizarre linguistics addiction wants to lick this poster to suck up the wordnerd goodness.

(Source: languageek)

English Pronunciation

who-needs-shelter:

xchrononautx:

kanrose:

If you can pronounce correctly every word in this poem, you will be speaking English better than 90% of the native English speakers in the world.

After trying the verses, a Frenchman said he’d prefer six months of hard labour to reading six lines aloud.

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[source]

I love this thing its brilliant. Even if its your mother tongue, read it aloud anyway it’s worth it I promise.

that was beautiful and fun to read aloud

(Source: coobiie)

1 year ago · 269,836 notes
#amazing #english #brilliant 

accioharo:

windyafternoon:

ilovecharts:

22 Maps That Show How Americans Speak English Totally Differently From Each Other

via moosespringsteen

I’m a little disheartened that a vast majority of the country doesn’t have a term for “sunshower.” Like…if you don’t get those where you’re from, I’m sorry, because that’s like some of my favorite weather.

I’m from the Kansas City area and I use the term sunshower! This may be because my dad lived in Florida while I was growing up though so I spent a lot of time down there.

check all 22 maps out ~ they’re awesome!! x”DD

1 year ago · 8,581 notes
#english #american english #US #lol 

The English language is like London: proudly barbaric yet deeply civilised, too, common yet royal, vulgar yet processional, sacred yet profane. Each sentence we produce, whether we know it or not, is a mongrel mouthful of Chaucerian, Shakespearean, Miltonic, Johnsonian, Dickensian and American. Military, naval, legal, corporate, criminal, jazz, rap and ghetto discourses are mingled at every turn. The French language, like Paris, has attempted, through its Academy, to retain its purity, to fight the advancing tides of Franglais and international prefabrication. English, by comparison, is a shameless whore.

Stephen Fry, The Ode Less Travelled: Unlocking the Poet Within  (via lesavions) —

2 years ago · 85 notes
#quotes #english #brilliant